Planes, But No Trains or Automobiles

I’ve spent way too much time in airports lately, but my time loss is Grammarian-in-the-City’s gain, because those hours yielded some interesting material for this blog.

First up is a sign in JFK Airport that I stared at for what seemed like hours (because it actually was hours — the plane was late):

Good advice. I hate collaborating alone.

Moving on, I saw this advertisement in Madrid’s Barajas Airport:

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m not sure what a “deli flight” is, but I’m certain that I didn’t have one. I’m pretty sure I don’t want one, either.

Speaking of Barajas, the map of stores and other amenities in Terminal 4 included this item:

The number 15 corresponds to a spot on the map (I think), so that’s one mystery solved. I never did find the “Hour Passion” store to see what it was selling. I’m not sure I want to know.

My ideal airport would let me get in, get on, and get out as quickly as possible. Too bad that ideal never becomes remotely real. If you’re flying during the holidays, good luck!  Feel free to send me any interesting signs you encounter.

4 thoughts on “Planes, But No Trains or Automobiles

  1. Ellie P.

    “Collaborating together”! Don’t you hate redundant repetition?

    But I think I’d like the “Deli Flight” – only if they provided mustard though.

    I’m not travelling now but will keep my eyes peeled at La Guardia next summer when I see my son!

    Reply
    1. Geraldine Post author

      Redundant repetition is bad, but repetitive repetition is worse. (Insert smirk here.) Not sure about mustard on crowded planes. One pop of that little packet and you’re yellowish brown for the rest of the ride. Ellie, if you’re in LaGuardia or anywhere else in NYC, let me know!

      Reply
  2. william cooper

    Sure, the sign maker could have printed WORKING TOGETHER, but whatever the semantic gain would have been offset by the loss in alliterative effect and symmetrical design. Damned if she did,. . . .

    Reply

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